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Passages from history, myth and fiction
with exercises in grammar and composition
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shape (vb)
We shape our buildings, and afterwards our buildings shape us.
Winston Churchill (1874-1965)
Vyne House, Hampshire. © Simon Q, Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 2.0.
tickle (vb)
Earth is here so kind, that just tickle her with a hoe and she laughs with a harvest.
Douglas William Jerrold (1803-1857), speaking of Australia
Melbourne Docklands, Australia. © David Iliff, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 3.0.
all (det.)
In all forms of Government the people is the true legislator.
Edmund Burke (1729-1797), ‘Tracts on the Popery Laws’
Palace of Westminster from the air. © Miguel Mendez, Wikimedia Commons. CC BY-SA 2.0.
fire (n.)
What of the faith and fire within us
Men who march away
Ere the barn-cocks say
Night is growing gray?
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928), ‘Men who March Away’
York and Lancaster Regiment, Normandy, 1944. Imperial War Museums Collection, Wikimedia Commons. Public domain.
cover (n.)
And in green underwood and cover
Blossom by blossom the spring begins.
Algernon Charles Swinburne (1837-1909), ‘Atalanta in Calydon’ (1865)
Bluebells in Box Wood, Hertfordshire. © Airwolfhound, Wikimedia Commons. Licence: CC BY-SA 2.0
english language and history .com
Passages from history, myth and fiction
with exercises in grammar and composition
Apr 29
Saturday
1
The Outbreak of the Great War
Music: Frank Bridge
Germany felt she had a right to an empire like Britain’s, and she was willing to get it at the expense of her neighbours.

FROM the 1890s onwards Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany, envious of Britain’s industrial and colonial success and exhilarated by German unification, began pouring resources into battleships, weapons and manufacturing. Britain and other European nations, sensing danger, nervously followed suit.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Although. Also.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: War. Claim. Help.

Use together in one sentence: Follow suit. Tension. Success.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The Great War (11) History (322)
Mr Ivery Gets Away
Music: Camille Saint-Saens
Richard Hannay tracks a German spy down to a French château, but Hannay’s sense of fair play gives his enemy a chance.

‘HULLO, Mr Ivery,’ I said. ‘This is an odd place to meet again!’

In his amazement he fell back a step, while his hungry eyes took in my face. There was no mistake about the recognition. I saw something I had seen once before in him, and that was fear. Out went the light and he sprang for the door.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: See. Notice. Watch.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Mistake. Charge. Swing.

Use together in one sentence: Place. Fear. Something.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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Russia’s First Railway
Music: Mikhail Glinka
Sixteen-year-old John Wesley Hackworth brought a locomotive over to St Petersburg, and Russia’s railway revolution was ready for the off.

IN 1836, sixteen-year-old John Wesley Hackworth arrived in the Russian capital, St Petersburg, bearing the heavy responsibility of delivering a steam locomotive, built by his father Timothy at Shildon in County Durham, to the Russian Empire’s first railway line.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Sever. Severe. Several.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Purpose. Visit. Bear.

Use together in one sentence: Affable. Eye. Supplement.

More games: Précis. Sevens. Jigsaw. Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

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The ‘Ladies’ Diary’
Music: Ann Sheppard Mounsey
A long-lived annual of riddles, rhymes and really hard maths aimed specifically at Georgian Britain’s hidden public of clever women.

THE ‘Ladies’ Diary’, published annually in London from 1704 to 1841, offered an almanack of useful dates, astronomical events, rhyming riddles and readers’ queries, such as

“I should be glad to know, what is the composition of the India rubber; and how and where it is made”.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Regular. Frequent.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: Know. Date. Feature.

Use together in one sentence: Submission. Reader. Almanack.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

John Dalton
Music: Jan Ladislav Dussek
At fifteen John Dalton was a village schoolmaster in Kendal; at forty he had published the first scientific theory of atoms.

JOHN Dalton, a weaver’s boy, began his teaching career at fifteen, helping his elder brother to run a Quaker school in Kendal. He deepened his education by contributing maths problems to The Ladies’ Diary, and reading scientific works to Kendal’s distinguished natural philosopher John Gough, who was blind, in exchange for lessons in Latin and Greek.

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Grammar and Composition

Distinguish using sentences: Until. By.

Use as a noun and also as a verb: School. Pressure. Help.

Use together in one sentence: Gas. School. Mountain.

More games: Confusables. Spinner. Opposites. Verb or Noun? Active or Passive? Subject and Object. Adjectives. Word Classes.

Undoubting Thomas
Music: George Frideric Handel
Abbot Elfric praised St Thomas for demanding hard evidence for the resurrection.

THOMAS’S unbelief in Christ’s resurrection was not unforeseen, but happened in the foresight of God; for his touch made believers of us. His doubt did us more good than the other Apostles’ belief. For when that touch brought him to belief, it carried our doubt away.

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